Astral Riles

Re-staining a wood buffet

Re-staining a wood buffet

One of my clients is buying new furniture for her dining room. She really loves this particular piece and doesn't want to buy a new one. So she asked me if there was any way to spruce it up. My answer was "ABSOLUTELY"!!!! Even though, this buffet was pretty old, it was still in great shape. The options were to paint the buffet OR re-stain it. We agreed that re-staining the buffet to a darker reddish brown color was the way to go.             b1           b2       Below are the steps I took to re-stain this dining room buffet: 1.  Remove the existing finish. You absolutely have to remove the finish before you begin sanding, otherwise you will end up kicking yourself! The quickest way to remove paint or stain finishes is to use a chemical stripper. There are tons of options out there, but I chose the gel/paste stripper b/c it is less messy and you can simply use a brush to apply it to the furniture. I used Klean-Strip's "Strip-X" stripper to get this job done.  Most stained furniture pieces have a lacquer finish or a polyurethane gloss coating. Oh, btw, when using any chemical, please make sure you wear protective gloves and eye wear.       stripper-paste       2.  Sand the piece down using a coarse 60 or 80-grit sandpaper. You can use a sanding sponge, regular sandpaper or an orbit sander. Of course, the orbital sander is faster, and that is what I used for this particular project. The sanding sponges do come in handy when you have to get into tight spaces and or little grooves that the orbital sander can't reach.   3.  Prep the wood to be stained. After you sand using the coarse paper, you want to lightly sand the furniture using a fine or extra fine 150, 180 or 220-grit sandpaper. This will smooth out the wood to make it ready for the stain.       b3-after sanding       4.  The next step is to apply the stain. I used Minwax "Red Mahogany" stain. Please note that a little stain go a long way!!! You can use a brush, an old rag or a sponge to get the job done. I prefer to use an old rag. Take your rag dip it into the stain just slightly and begin to rub it on the wood. Cover the wood and wipe off all excess stain. You never ever want to use too much. Usually you only need one coat, but if you want the color to get darker then you must do multiple coats. The stain will get darker with each coat that you put on. You absolutely have to wait until the 1st coat dries before you apply the second coat.       red-stain           after_staining         after_staining1         after_staing2       5.  The final step is the sealer and/or gloss coat. I chose to use Minwax Polyurethane semi-gloss finish. First you apply a thin coat to the furniture. The product I used is fast-drying within 4-6 hours. After the poly dries then you use 220-grit sandpaper to lightly sand down the furniture to make sure the gloss coat went on evenly. Then wipe it down and apply a second coat of the poly for the final coat. Let it dry and you're all done!       poly           6.  And lastly I replaced the old cabinet & drawer hardware. I chose to go with a chrome finish to contrast with the wood color. I also re-used the existing hinges. They were a brass finish, so I simply used some metallic spray paint to make them match the new drawer & cabinet pulls. Why spend money to buy new stuff if you don't need to right?????     [caption id="attachment_1042" align="alignnone" width="640"] BEFORE[/caption]     [caption id="attachment_1048" align="alignnone" width="640"]AFTER AFTER[/caption]        

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